Every day in the United States, over 8 people are killed and more than 1,161 people are injured in crashes that are reported to involve a distracted driver. Distracted driving is driving while doing another activity that takes your attention away from driving. Distracted driving can increase the chance of a motor vehicle crash.

Distracted driving activities include things like using a cell phone, texting, and eating. Using in-vehicle technologies (such as navigation systems) can also be sources of distraction. While any of these distractions can endanger the driver and others, texting while driving is especially dangerous because it combines all three types of distraction.

There are three main types of distraction:

  • Visual: taking your eyes off the road;
  • Manual: taking your hands off the wheel; and
  • Cognitive: taking your mind off what you are doing.

Fast Facts on Distracted Driving

  • In 2013, 3,154 people were killed in crashes involving a distracted driver, compared to 3,328 in 2012. An additional, 424,000 people were injured in motor vehicle crashes involving a distracted driver in 2013.
  • In 2013, nearly one in five crashes (18%) in which someone was injured involved distracted driving.
  • In 2013, more than two out of five students who drove in the past 30 days sent a text or email while driving.

Source: CDC